Numlock News: May 22, 2020 • Robots, Hurricanes, American Cheese

By Walt Hickey

Today is Numlock’s second anniversary! Thank you so much for reading.

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We’re off Monday to commemorate Memorial Day. See you Tuesday, and thanks again for reading.

Robots

We all remember and love Sphero, the delightful company behind those zany rolling robots, like the BB-8 and R2-D2 rolling toys that were seemingly everywhere after Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Well, things took a turn at the Sphero company after their licensing deal with Disney expired in 2018, and the latest news is that the robotics manufacturer has pivoted and spun off a new venture called Company Six, which specializes in robots for military, police, and other first responders. They’ve raised $3 million and the former Sphero COO will head up the new venture. Listen, it’s never great to dwell on one’s own mortality, but I have to say: the fact that the probability of an armed, rolling killbot that looks kind of like BB-8 one day slaying me has increased from “zero chance” on Monday to “low, but definitely not zero” by Friday made this kind of a rough week.

James Vincent, The Verge and Nick Greenhalgh, American Inno

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Downeaster

The switch from restaurant dining to home cooking has been onerous for a few sources of protein in particular more than others. Some are already mostly consumed in the home: in 2019, about 62 percent of eggs were consumed through retail and grocery stores compared to 38 percent consumed through food service. Pork and beef had basically an even split. In 2019, 54 percent of both proteins were consumed through restaurants rather than at home. But seafood is different: only 30 percent of seafood was consumed at home with 70 percent moving through kitchens. That’s one reason salmon prices are down 23 percent year to date, and lobster tails are down 16.6 percent. Jeez, first we see the lights go out on Broadway, then people underpaid gig workers who subsist mostly on tips, and now there ain't much future for a man who works the sea. Did… did Billy Joel know this was coming? Has he been trying to warn us the whole time? And what precisely did he mean by for the longest time?

Jesse Newman and Julie Wernau, The Wall Street Journal

Friends

Once it was possible to bemoan that no one told you life was going to be this way, but now we have widespread and comprehensive polling, so we actually have a pretty good sense of what’s coming up. While poaching Friends from Netflix was touted as a crown jewel in the forthcoming HBO Max streaming library, it’s actually not the most appealing entry in their library by a long shot. Based on a survey of 2,200 adults conducted by Morning Consult, 34 percent cited the HBO shows as the biggest draw. Looking deeper at specific franchises, 26 percent cited the DC Comics Universe shows as something that makes them more likely to subscribe, 23 percent cited Game of Thrones, and 21 percent cited Friends. Meanwhile, just 13 percent of people correctly identified Friends as part of the HBO Max content lineup, and there are just a few weeks until launch.

Natalie Jarvey, The Hollywood Reporter

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When In Doubt, Charlie Out

Several teenagers who were unable to use the buggy College Board website to upload Advanced Placement exam responses filed a class action lawsuit against the testmonger in California. The company charges $94 per exam, but was unable to process the HEIC photo uploads from iPhones, among many other issues related to submitting answers. The College Board estimated 1 percent of test responses were rejected by their tech, which given 2.1 million exams in the first week of the APs is still 21,000 children who spent $94 and weeks of studying for naught. To compound the troubles for the standardized testing group, the University of California regents voted unanimously to eliminate SAT and ACT testing from consideration starting in 2025.

Jeffrey S. Solocheck, Tampa Bay Times and Teresa Watanabe, The Los Angeles Times

Abalone

Abalone poaching in South Africa — where unauthorized divers raid beds of protected shellfish for considerable payouts — has seen prices collapse following lockdowns, though onlookers fear that when the market returns it’ll be worse than ever. Abalone is popular in China and can fetch $100 per kilogram, if a South African is willing to dice shark-infested waters to get them. Chinese mafia groups and South African drug cartels now control the market for illegal abalone and have overseen the harvest of some 45,000 tonnes of abalone, at a pace of about six tonnes per day. The money from this trade is everywhere, with two officials in the South African fisheries department enduring simultaneous, yet separate abalone scandals at one point in 2018. The local price is down to $22 to $45 per kilogram.

Kimon de Greef, Hakai Magazine

Hurricane

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s projection for 2020’s hurricane season is out, and the forecast is for an above-average season with up to 19 named storms of which 10 will develop into hurricanes and three to six will become Category 3 or higher. NOAA’s pretty good at figuring out hurricane patterns. Since 2010, they’ve successfully gotten the storm count and hurricane count within the projection six times.

Erin Ailworth, The Wall Street Journal

Cheese

The cold storage stockpile of American and total natural cheeses rose 8 percent in April, the biggest single monthly gain since 2012. There are now 1.5 billion pounds of cheese in cold storage, the highest level on record since the USDA first decided to start asking around about cheese in 1917. Cheese stores jumped from 515 million pounds in 1980 to 1.2 billion by 1983, only to crash back down to 330 million by the end of the ‘80s. Since that bottom, though, the amount of cheese in reserve has been steadily rising, passing 600 million pounds in cold storage at the turn of the millennium and rising steadily to the glut we have today. One reason for the spike is that Americans consume a lot of cheese at restaurants.

James Attwood and Dominic Carey, Bloomberg

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Correction: an earlier version of this post misstated the price of abalone, it’s $100 retail, not to produce.

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2020 Sunday special editions: Comics Future · Comics History · Streaming · COBOL · Esoteric Political History · Instagram · Weird · Copper · Transit · Shakespeare · Hot Hand · 2020 Movies · AB5 · Sharing · Astronauts · Casper · Minimalism · Ghost Gear · Tech jobs · Directors

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Numlock News: May 21, 2020 • Escape, Reactor, Fyre

By Walt Hickey

Hey! Numlock’s second birthday is tomorrow so for the next week I’m doing a big sale on paid subscriptions. The weekday Numlock is free-to-read and totally without ads thanks to the many folks who pay to get the Sunday editions, which feature insightful interviews and exclusive looks behind the stories featured in the weekday edition.

Get access to the Sunday interviews and support the newsletter at a great intro rate: 22 percent off the $50 annual subscription, or just take your first two months of the $5 monthly for free.

Escape

Escape rooms — public attractions where groups of people interact with surroundings to collaborate and solve a challenging problem — had just hit the mainstream, jumping from 24 such attractions in the U.S. in 2014 to 1,900 by 2017 to 2,350 escape rooms in 2019. Unfortunately, 2020 happens to be a business environment that eliminates things like public attractions, groups of people, interaction with surroundings, and collaborative solutions to challenging problems. Some owners are improvising — a camera, a smartphone, and a willing aide, and the experience of solving a room over the internet is possible — while others are waiting it out. My boyfriend recently developed a creative at-home Top Chef-themed escape room right in our apartment! The gist is I’m locked in a bedroom with an hour on the clock, and if I escape the room and bug him while he’s trying to watch Restaurant Wars he will flay me.

Dina Bass, Bloomberg

Billion

What once was unthinkable has finally happened: a single YouTube channel beat one billion views on the platform in a single week. That’s a pace of 99,000 views per minute, and truly an achievement. Who’s the bleeding-edge young talent that notched 1.04 billion views last week, redefining the aesthetics and storytelling of the future through innovative youth appeal? It’s Cocomelon — Nursery Rhymes. It’s a video channel of nursery rhymes. Lots of kids are stuck at home. Very lucrative. Always nice to be reminded that the most popular hit single in the world at any given time is, from a certain perspective, the Alphabet Song.

Sam Gutelle, TubeFilter

The Snyder Cut

The release of Justice League in 2017 was disappointing: here was a film that had Batman, Superman, and Wonder Woman — three characters it’s universally agreed are pretty rad and beloved, and with a track record of working incredibly well together — and the movie made like $225 million domestically, behind Despicable Me 3 and nine other movies. It was panned critically, and for years fans held to an idea that a cut of the movie must exist that was not a fiasco. They were wrong, no such cut exists, but Warner really wants people to sign up for their new streaming service HBO Max, so they’re giving Zack Snyder somewhere between $20 million and $30 million to do reshoots, upgrade visual effects, and effectively re-do much of post-production to create what would have been the Snyder Cut had he not stepped away from the film. His first cut of the film was allegedly four hours long, because Lawrence of Arabia just blows by too quick I guess, and the suits at Warner made them cut it to two hours 20 minutes, and then another filmmaker came in to finish the film.

Borys Kit, The Hollywood Reporter

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Fyre Money

Kendall Jenner will pay $90,000 to settle a suit over her Instagram post that promoted the doomed Fyre Festival, a purported music festival that shambolically deteriorated in real-time on a Bahamian beach. Jenner, who has about 129 million followers on the platform, was alleged to be paid $250,000 for the Instagram post to promote the event and then got another $25,000 several days later. Right now, a bankruptcy trustee is working to recover money for the creditors bamboozled into staking the idiotic venture. Listen, if this is what it takes to remove a rival bid from the auction for MoviePass I’m fine with it.

Jonathan Randles, The Wall Street Journal

Money Fire

Gallatin, Tennessee voted yesterday to authorize tax credits worth $19.5 million over 20 years to a recipient code-named “Project Woolhawk” in exchange for their construction of a data center in the vicinity. It’s unconfirmed who the recipient actually is given the shell companies used in the negotiations, but it’s believed by policymakers to be Facebook, though the local head of development claims to have no idea who the company behind the shell is. Even in the realm of local governments doling out tax incentives — a practice that rarely results in the desired gains for a reasonable price — data centers are a uniquely bad investment, as the jobs they create are not permanent because once they’re up and running it doesn’t take too many people to keep the lights on compared to other businesses. Facebook has collected roughly $375 million in state and local subsidies in its data center projects, mostly from Texas and Utah.

Pat Garofalo, Boondoggle

Reaction

There are 96 commercial nuclear reactors in the United States, supplying 20 percent of the electrical power in the country and about 50 percent of the carbon-free energy. That’s down from 113 in the early 1990s, and nuclear’s position in the energy mix will soon begin to slip. That’s bad because given how cheap petroleum fuels are right now, it’s not like those plants will be immediately replaced by sunshine and breezes. The Department of Energy’s new Advanced Reactor Demonstration Program is investing in getting two new prototype reactors up and running within seven years. It’s investing $230 million this year, with the goal of coming up with new reactor designs that are more efficient and effective at using the fuel.

Adrian Cho, Science Magazine

Port of Los Angeles

The port of L.A. is the busiest in the U.S., and while demand has fallen sharply for consumer goods, boats containing loads of them from China are nevertheless still in motion. The space crunch is unheard of: there are 1.8 billion square feet of warehousing in the port — which spans 7,500 acres and incorporates 43 miles of waterways — and approximately 1 percent of that warehouse and distribution space is vacant, an unprecedented crunch. This is happening across the world, so some shipping companies are now directing their ships to take the scenic route. With a trip through the Suez Canal costing a half million dollars for a container ship and bunker fuel at rock bottom prices, why not take a trip around Africa instead if you’re not in a hurry anymore?

Jackie Northam, NPR

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Correction: An earlier version of this piece said an investment was $230 billion when it was $230 million.


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2020 Sunday special editions: Comics Future · Comics History · Streaming · COBOL · Esoteric Political History · Instagram · Weird · Copper · Transit · Shakespeare · Hot Hand · 2020 Movies · AB5 · Sharing · Astronauts · Casper · Minimalism · Ghost Gear · Tech jobs · Directors

2019 Sunday special editions: 2019 · TI-84 · Heated · Hemp · Kylie Cosmetics · Secondhand · Biometrics · Voting Machines · Open Borders ·  WrestleMania ·  Game of Thrones ·  Concussion Snake Oil ·  Skyglow ·  Juul ·  Chris Ingraham ·  Invasive Species ·  The Rat Spill ·  
The Sterling Affairs ·  Snakebites ·  Bees ·  Deep Fakes ·  Artificial Intelligence ·  Marijuana ·  Mussels · 100% Renewable Grid ·  Drive Thru Dreams ·  Department Stores & Champion ·  Baltimore Crab Shacks ·  Kylie Jenner · Amber Fossils ·  Self-Improvement ·  Box Office Forecasting ·  Crazy/Genius ·  Scrubbers ·  Saving the World ·  Summer Movies ·  No One Man Should Have All That Power ·  Film Incentives ·  Stadiums & Casinos ·  Late Night ·  65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

Numlock News: May 20, 2020 • Jupiter, Cuneiform, Madonna

By Walt Hickey

Hey! Numlock’s second birthday is this Friday so for the next week I’m doing a big sale on paid subscriptions. Get access to the Sunday interviews and support the newsletter at a great intro rate: 22 percent off the $50 annual subscription, or just take your first two months of the $5 monthly for free.

Cuneiform

In 2014, arts and crafts store Hobby Lobby purchased the 5-by-6-inch Gilgamesh Dream Tablet for more than $1.6 million, a 3,500-year-old object that I suppose technically qualifies as an art and/or craft. The goal for the purchase was for the clay tablet to be displayed in the company-owned Museum of the Bible, but on Monday, U.S. federal prosecutors filed a complaint seeking the tablet’s return to Iraq, where it is believed to have been looted from, possibly when nine of the country’s 13 regional museums were ransacked in 1991. Hobby Lobby purchased the item from a major auction house, which had declined to auction it because of its unclear origin: it was originally bought for $50,350 in 2003, passing through two other owners and was linked with false letters of provenance.

Jane Arraf, NPR

Ransom

The law firm of Grubman Shire Meiselas & Sacks was attacked with ransomware earlier this month, with a hacker group going by REvil claiming responsibility. The hackers stole 756 gigabytes of data and are threatening to release those documents unless the firm pays a $42 million ransom. The firm works as attorneys for lots of actors and musicians — Madonna, Bruce Springsteen, Usher among them — and the group said they’ll begin to release documents unless their demands are met. An employment contract for Madonna’s world tour was leaked as proof, and the hackers say they’ll auction off one person’s file every week, starting with Madonna on May 25. Listen, nobody has this much vitriol for Madonna except one person: Cher. What do you think the odds are that she pulled a Britney and picked up some Python, maybe started lurking on HackForums? It’s the perfect crime.

Ashley Cullins, The Hollywood Reporter

Polo

The greatest coach in the history of the Olympic Games has retired: Ratko Rudic, the Bill Belichick of water polo, has retired at age 71. He’s appeared nine times at the Olympics, winning six medals — five as coach, one as player, four of them Gold — for five countries, which is the most appearances, golds, medals and longevity for any coach in Olympic history. He one time yelled at a ref so hard they asked him to stay away from water polo for a year. He was a legend and all who come after him will be merely treading water in his enormous wake.

Joshua Robinson and Ben Cohen, The Wall Street Journal

Virality

According to an analysis by Merriam-Webster, people have seriously cut back on saying that vastly popular things “go viral,” because of reasons. Overall use of the word “viral” is up 46 percent in the first four months of 2020 compared to the same four months of 2019, but the use of the shorthand for posts is down: based on a computation linguistic analysis of news articles, there are 15 percent fewer “viral videos” and 21 percent fewer “viral photos” over the period, and all told the frequency of the phrase “go viral” is down 26 percent.

Abby Ohlheiser, MIT Technology Review

Airlines

Congratulations to the airline industry, which has just knocked it out of the park with a 123 percent increase in weekly air travelers in just a month! Granted, that’s an increase from an average 95,161 people going through U.S. airport security daily in the week ending April 17 compared to 212,580 on average last week, which is way, way down from the 2.4 million travelers seen a year ago. This is just one reminder that lots of economic data is going to look deeply weird for quite some time.

Neil Irwin, The Upshot

Exclusivity

Spotify bagged Joe Rogan, inking a deal where they will be the exclusive distributor in the U.S. of his vastly popular podcast “The Joe Rogan Experience.” Rogan is a massive presence atop the Apple Podcast charts, a service that accounts for over 60 percent of the listeners of most podcasts. Spotify is attempting to solve that problem the old-fashioned way, by throwing gobs of money at it, and it appears to be working out for them: though they paid Rogan tens of millions — perhaps north of $100 million — to jump ship, Spotify shares jumped 11 percent on the news, a market cap increase of several billion dollars, drawing comparisons to Howard Stern getting poached from terrestrial radio to Sirius Satellite Radio in 2004.

Lucas Shaw, Bloomberg

Moons

A new astronomical model lays out a theory for how the four moons of Jupiter formed, arguing that they accumulated from millimeter-sized grains of hail that were produced during the formation of the solar system. Essentially, the four Galilean moons formed bit by bit, one grain at a time: first the dust accumulated into a disk around Jupiter, then moons began to agglomerate. In the model, Io formed in 1,000 years, then Europa formed 10,000 years later over the course of 1,000 years, then 30,000 years later Ganymede formed over the course of 2,000 years, then Callisto — which had the least material to work with — formed over the course of 8 million years.

Shannon Stirone, The New York Times

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Now when you tell a friend to sign up for Numlock, you’ll get some free Numlock stickers and magnets if you go to swag.numlock.news. It’s a great way to reach new readers organically.

Thank you so much for subscribing! If you're enjoying the newsletter, forward it to someone you think may enjoy it too! Send links to me on Twitter at @WaltHickey or email me with numbers, tips, or feedback at walt@numlock.news. Send corrections or typos to the copy desk at copy@numlock.news.

Want more? Join the Numlock Book Club, or check out the award season supplement.

The very best way to reach new readers is word of mouth. If you click THIS LINK in your inbox, it’ll create an easy-to-send pre-written email you can just fire off to some friends.

2020 Sunday special editions: Comics Future · Comics History · Streaming · COBOL · Esoteric Political History · Instagram · Weird · Copper · Transit · Shakespeare · Hot Hand · 2020 Movies · AB5 · Sharing · Astronauts · Casper · Minimalism · Ghost Gear · Tech jobs · Directors

2019 Sunday special editions: 2019 · TI-84 · Heated · Hemp · Kylie Cosmetics · Secondhand · Biometrics · Voting Machines · Open Borders ·  WrestleMania ·  Game of Thrones ·  Concussion Snake Oil ·  Skyglow ·  Juul ·  Chris Ingraham ·  Invasive Species ·  The Rat Spill ·  
The Sterling Affairs ·  Snakebites ·  Bees ·  Deep Fakes ·  Artificial Intelligence ·  Marijuana ·  Mussels · 100% Renewable Grid ·  Drive Thru Dreams ·  Department Stores & Champion ·  Baltimore Crab Shacks ·  Kylie Jenner · Amber Fossils ·  Self-Improvement ·  Box Office Forecasting ·  Crazy/Genius ·  Scrubbers ·  Saving the World ·  Summer Movies ·  No One Man Should Have All That Power ·  Film Incentives ·  Stadiums & Casinos ·  Late Night ·  65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

Numlock News: May 19, 2020 • Melatonin, Meth, Meat

By Walt Hickey

Melatonin

About 25 percent of children and adolescents have problems falling and staying asleep, and in times when families are in tight quarters for extended periods of time, those problems are seeming a bit more acute. Children’s melatonin supplements — chewable gummy bears laced with one milligram or so of the sleep aid — saw sales pop 87 percent in March 2020 compared to the same month of 2019. And while many gasp and say they would never use a pharmaceutical to compel a child to sleep, 10 weeks in it seems like a whole lot of parents revised that parenting belief to something like, “listen, I’ll probably never use ether to knock them out.” The maximum dosage of melatonin for kids under 88 pounds is three milligrams if you’re looking for the scoop on the Mother’s Little Helper of 2020.

Christina Caron, The New York Times

Beer

Tough times lead some to desperate measures, as seen in the 3.8 percent increase in the volume of Bud Light sold in both March and April compared to 2019 levels. That bump in popularity comes after months of year-over-year decline in Bud consumption. The crisis has challenged the small craft brewers to their core, while the bigs — Bud Light, Miller Lite, and Coors Light — are seeing their downward sales trajectory turn around. Anheuser-Busch InBev’s U.S. sales are up 1.9 percent, and sales of mainstream beers are up 10.7 percent year-over-year. Meanwhile, of 8,000 craft breweries in the U.S., 400 had been expected to fold pre-pandemic, but now as many as three-in-five could go under barring an intervention.

Jennifer Maloney, The Wall Street Journal

Free TV

Ad-supported streaming broadcast TV is having a moment, with Pluto TV seeing its number of monthly active users jump 55 percent in March compared to the prior year to 24 million people. Downloads of their app — which can simulate the over-the-air television available to people with a television antennae — tripled in April to 3 million compared to 900,000 in January. Similar pops were seen for rival Tubi (4 million sign ups over the same period, up 30 percent) and Vudu (673,000, a 55 percent jump). This could revive a model — ad-supported free streaming — that had previously been difficult to sell while rivals were reaping serious subscription revenue.

Christopher Palmeri and Lucas Shaw, Bloomberg

Cars

The amount of money Americans owe on their vehicles has been rising rapidly over the past decade. In March, there were nearly 116 million car loans that totaled $1.3 trillion, an average of $11,476 each. And while they’re generally lower in size, there are now more car loan accounts than mortgages. The total outstanding value owed is up 54.7 percent since 2009, up $395 billion, outpacing every other debt category that isn’t student loans. It’s always wild to see how many Americans are throwing money at vehicles when they could be investing in more useful assets, like bankrupt movie ticketing services whose remains have been put up for auction in an attempt to compensate creditors.

Joseph W. Kane, Brookings

Meats

A series of stories about reduced meat production owing to supply chain difficulties led to another run on meat in the week ending May 3, with meat department dollar sales up 51.3 percent and volume up 37 percent. Some stores enforced purchase limits as supply slowed — though both have rebounded slightly, pork production is still down 24 percent compared to 2019 and beef is down 32 percent — but total meat department sales were over $1.6 billion in the week.

Anne-Marie Roerink, Winsight Grocery Business

Supply Chain Difficulties

Police in Myanmar have seized a truly breathtaking amount of meth in the largest drug bust in Asia in decades. Thirty-three people were arrested and police seized 200 million methamphetamine tablets, 500 kilograms of crystal meth, and 990 gallons of liquid methylfentanyl. They also seized 163,000 liters and 35.5 metric tons of precursor chemicals. Synthetics have become particularly fashionable in the drug trade as global drug enforcement has made it difficult to grow fields of opium or coca and the laboratory-made stuff is easier to mass produce, if dicier for the end user.

Joshua Berlinger, CNN

Pole

From 1840 to 1990, the north magnetic pole moved about 15 kilometers per year, beginning in northern Canada and meandering towards the proper pole. The magnetic pole is a result of Earth’s magnetic field, and two enormous blobs of material in Earth’s mantle — one under Canada, the other Siberia — make it so the magnetic pole is situated between the two. Well, the Canadian blob reconfigured, and starting in the ‘90s the pole began shifting at 60 kilometers per year, sprinting towards Russia and crossing the International Date Line in late 2017. Such movements happen, and the current estimate is it’ll keep moving towards Siberia for another 390 kilometers to 660 kilometers at which point it’s anyone’s guess.

Phil Plait, SyFy Wire

This week in the Sunday edition I concluded my two-part interview about the comic business with John Jackson Miller. He’s the archivist behind Comichron, an outstanding resource for historical comic sales data, as well as the author of a number of books, including the forthcoming Star Trek: Discovery - Die Standing out on June 14. See all his books here.

Thanks to the paid subscribers to Numlock News who make this possible. Subscribers guarantee this stays ad-free, and get a special Sunday edition. Consider becoming a full subscriber today.


Now when you tell a friend to sign up for Numlock, you’ll get some free Numlock stickers and magnets if you go to swag.numlock.news. It’s a great way to reach new readers organically.

Thank you so much for subscribing! If you're enjoying the newsletter, forward it to someone you think may enjoy it too! Send links to me on Twitter at @WaltHickey or email me with numbers, tips, or feedback at walt@numlock.news. Send corrections or typos to the copy desk at copy@numlock.news.

Want more? Join the Numlock Book Club, or check out the award season supplement.

The very best way to reach new readers is word of mouth. If you click THIS LINK in your inbox, it’ll create an easy-to-send pre-written email you can just fire off to some friends.

2020 Sunday special editions: Comics Future · Comics History · Streaming · COBOL · Esoteric Political History · Instagram · Weird · Copper · Transit · Shakespeare · Hot Hand · 2020 Movies · AB5 · Sharing · Astronauts · Casper · Minimalism · Ghost Gear · Tech jobs · Directors

2019 Sunday special editions: 2019 · TI-84 · Heated · Hemp · Kylie Cosmetics · Secondhand · Biometrics · Voting Machines · Open Borders ·  WrestleMania ·  Game of Thrones ·  Concussion Snake Oil ·  Skyglow ·  Juul ·  Chris Ingraham ·  Invasive Species ·  The Rat Spill ·  
The Sterling Affairs ·  Snakebites ·  Bees ·  Deep Fakes ·  Artificial Intelligence ·  Marijuana ·  Mussels · 100% Renewable Grid ·  Drive Thru Dreams ·  Department Stores & Champion ·  Baltimore Crab Shacks ·  Kylie Jenner · Amber Fossils ·  Self-Improvement ·  Box Office Forecasting ·  Crazy/Genius ·  Scrubbers ·  Saving the World ·  Summer Movies ·  No One Man Should Have All That Power ·  Film Incentives ·  Stadiums & Casinos ·  Late Night ·  65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

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