Numlock News: March 22, 2019

By Walt Hickey

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No Pressure

Kunxun is a two-month old female wolfdog and is China’s first cloned police puppy. Her DNA came from Huahuangma, a veteran dog with a record of multiple solved cases, so I imagine Kunxun is under all sorts of pressure right now with a reputation that precedes here. The cost of the cloned dog — 380,000 yuan, or about $56,000 — is worth it because it’s undeniably more consistent than attempting to breed a new generation with that degree of skill. In 2007, South Korea became the first country to introduce cloned dogs for security work. Now if you’ll excuse me, I have a billion dollars to make by writing a movie about the top bomb-sniffing dog on the force, a jaded and tough crime fighting vet, who gets partnered up with the new rookie on the force who just happens to be… herself?

Linda Lew, Inkstone

MLCCs

A shortage of a tiny electronic component is causing major headaches for hardware manufacturers. A multi-layer ceramic capacitor — MLCC — costs half a penny and is abundant in basically every major piece of hardware produced these days. A GoPro Hero 5 has 326 capacitors, an iPhone 6S has 500, an iPhone X has 1,000 and a Tesla Model 3 has 9,200. But demand for the essential part has vastly outstripped supply, with a shortage declared by a major distributor in 2018 that is projected to last through 2020, with MLCC orders backed up for almost a year. Scaling up production isn’t that simple — build too much new production capacity and you’re sitting on a glut, which drives prices down on a part that already comes on razor-thin margins.

Daniel Wolfe, Quartz

NCAA

The annual NCAA men’s basketball tournament makes up a fairly ridiculous percentage of the total income of the NCAA. As big as college football seems, as big as the rest of college sports appear, it’s March Madness that keeps the (ha) not-for-profit in the black. The $804 million the NCAA will get for broadcasting rights this year plus other revenues associated with the event make up about 80 percent of the $1.1 billion in revenue the NCAA clears. That television contract will rise to an estimated $873 million by 2023, a $69 million rise of which $0 will go to the actual players.

Eben Novy-Williams, Bloomberg

Hollywood Is Having An Episode

The Writer’s Guild and the talent agencies are still wrangling over their agreements ahead of what could turn into a major labor action if there’s a failure to reach an agreement. The writers, broadly, see a massive conflict of interest in their representatives working for the same company that produces the projects they are paid to work on, while the agencies have spent the past decades orchestrating “packaging deals” as a synergistic way to bring in more revenues overall. We’ve now hit the “competing studies” phase of the standoff. UTA, one agency, released a study saying TV writer clients made $3,374 more per episode on shows that were packaged versus shows that were not packaged. The writers countered with evidence that overall wages are flat, pointing out that a writer with a producer credit on a half hour comedy in its first season made $15,000 per episode in 1999, or $23,400 today, while last year the median fee for a writer in the same position was $16,000. It’s a pretty fascinating look behind the scenes at how television is made, but the deadline is fast approaching and could get ugly.

Dave McNary, Variety

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Last Sunday, I spoke to the Urban Institute’s Eugene Steuerle all about how the way America thinks about aging is actively hurting the way we develop policy. He can be found at his blog, The Government We Deserve.

Netflix Originals

The percentage of original movie and series titles on Netflix’s American service has jumped considerably from 4 percent of the catalog in 2016 to 11 percent at the end of last year. Compare that with Hulu and Amazon, for whom originals account for 1 percent of their catalogs, but also with HBO Go and Showtime Anytime, where 35 percent and 15 percent respectively are original. In 2016, 25 percent of titles released on Netflix were made in-house, a figure that since rose to 51 percent, meaning that, yes, Netflix’s gazillion dollar money fire is indeed producing content. Still, Netflix has a ton of exposure to the whims of the major studios it now is directly competing with: 30 percent of the content on Netflix comes from one of those majors, all of whom are in some stage of developing their own exclusive streaming service.

Scott Roxborough, The Hollywood Reporter

Uniqlo

The Uniqlo brand is a juggernaut in Japan but is still attempting to break in stateside. The brand of clothing staples has over 800 stores in Japan and accounts for about 6.5 percent of the total Japanese apparel market. The company’s owner is the richest person in Japan. Its attempts to move into the U.S. have not gone off without a hit: the company aimed to have $10 billion in sales from 200 U.S. stores by 2020, but now operates 50 stores at a loss. Still, the international push is getting returns: operating income outside of Japan grew 62 percent in 2018, as the company has been regrouping in urban markets rather than using locations in malls to take a stab at the house that Gap built.

Gillian B. White, The Atlantic

College

The college admissions scandal that gripped the nation did a great job of reminding people how unpleasant the whole transition from high school to college could be, while also distracting from some of the more potent issues in higher ed. About 90 percent of young people have some interaction with college. The real issue isn’t about the admission so much as the exit. Only about 60 percent of four-year college students graduate within six years. Only 30 percent of community college students — who get a degree in two years — graduate within six years. That’s a bigger story than funny business in admissions at a few snooty schools, and a concerning driver of the student debt bubble.

Nicholas Lemann, The New Yorker


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Previous 2019 Sunday special editions: 65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

2018 Sunday Editions: 2018  ·  Game of Thrones  ·  Signal Problems · CTE and Football · Facebook · Shark Repellent · Movies · Voting Rights · Goats · Invitation Only · Fat Bear Week · Weinersmith · Airplane Bathrooms ·  NIMBYs ·  Fall 2018 Sports Analytics ·  The Media  ·  Omega-3  ·  Mattress Troubles  ·  Conspiracy Theorists  ·  Beaches  ·  Bubbles  ·  NYC Trash  ·  Fish Wars  ·  Women’s Jeans  ·  Video Stores

Numlock News: March 21, 2019

By Walt Hickey

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Spring Break!

Miami Beach is under siege by a legion of revelers, and the city’s plan to deal with the crowds is under pressure. A $1.1 million security plan may end up costing the city $1.5 million with new measures proposed this week, namely more officers patrolling the beach to seize booze and drugs. With even more reinforcements from other departments, there will be 371 officers working this weekend, among the busiest of the season. Still, it’s not all the fault of the visitors: of 97 people arrested this past weekend, over half were from the tri-county area and only 11 identified as college students, proving once again that no frat boy, no spring breaker, no club kid gets drunker on alcoholic slushies than Florida Man.

Kyra Gurney, Miami Herald

Doggies

There were 580,900 puppies and dogs voluntarily registered in 2018 with the American Kennel Club, and of those 88,175 were Labrador Retrievers, cementing their adorable stranglehold atop the most popular dog in America list for the 28th consecutive year. Following labs were German Shepards, Golden Retrievers, French Bulldogs and Bulldogs. The French Bulldog was one of the really fascinating stories of popularity, jumping from 83rd place 25 years ago to fourth place for the past two years.

Jennifer Peltz, The Associated Press

FCC Complaints

The results are in and the Super Bowl broadcast led to 94 complaints being lodged with the Federal Communications Commission. Of those, 58 FCC complaints specifically took issue with Adam Levine and Maroon 5’s halftime show performance, while trailers for Scary Stories to Tell in The Dark and Us led to a dozen-ish apiece. Still, there’s something inherently patriotic about reading each and every one of your fellow countrymen’s complaints regarding Adam Levine’s nipples, and a welcome reminder that yes, this country was started by Puritans, and less has changed than we’d like.

Barry Petchesky, Deadspin

San Andreas

When the San Andreas fault line inevitably causes a large earthquake, the damages will be significant. A U.S. Geological Survey model that tries to find the impact of a quake that moves along the southern 200 miles of the fault line found that L.A. would experience shaking for an estimated 50 seconds, a fearsome time compared to the 7 seconds the $40 billion in damage Northridge earthquake inflicted in 1994. The simulations found an estimated 1,500 buildings in L.A. would collapse and 300,000 were severely damaged, mainly the buildings constructed prior to the latest advancements in earthquake-resistant architecture and were never retrofitted. Why is that? Building codes require developers to construct buildings that won’t kill people in an earthquake, but don’t go so far as to require those buildings be usable afterwards.

Lucy Jones, Literary Hub

Diesel

Already, the shift to electric vehicles is making a slight difference in oil demand. It’s not electric cars accounting for most of the gains though, but rather electric buses. Given their size and round-the-clock use, China’s switch to electric buses is major, and by the end of the year, worldwide use of electric buses will displace 270,000 barrels a day of diesel demand. For every 1,000 electric buses on the road, about 500 barrels of diesel are displaced daily, compared to just 15 barrels displaced for every thousand personal electric vehicles.

Alaric Nightengale, Bloomberg

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Media

Americans spend 44 percent of their total minutes available in a day interacting with media, a 10.5 hour-per-day media diet that’s pretty much flat year-over-year. The average American spends almost two hours a day listening to the radio and over four hours per day watching live or time-shifted television. While the overall amount of time spent interacting with media is flat, some areas in particular are gaining: year over year, we’re spending 17 minutes more on apps or the web on smartphones and interaction with internet-connected devices overall is up 8 minutes compared to last year.

Nielsen

Red Lights

A proposal in the Texas Senate would shut down red light cameras across the Lone Star State, arguing that the robotickets violate constitutional rights and are really annoying. While previous bills have floundered, this one’s actually got the backing of the governor. While the cameras are annoying, arguably unconstitutional and pricey for violaters — since they were installed in Ft. Worth, the city’s brought in $80 million from overly ambitious drivers — they do have serious safety impacts. Since the cameras went up, accident rates in those areas are down 59 percent in Ft. Worth and 83 percent of people who got a ticket haven’t had a second one.

Anna M. Tinsley, Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Ads

Amazon’s operating a pretty fascinating ad business, booking $10.1 billion in ad revenue last year with 50 percent growth forecasted for this year. Retailers are shelling out lots of money to ensure premium placement on the Amazon page and in its search results. Analysts think that this modern take on supermarkets giving the best locations in the store to brands that play ball will be huge for Amazon, hitting $16 billion in operating earnings by 2021. However, Amazon’s also taking a new step in blocking ads for products that don’t actually make Amazon money, like products sold by vendors that actually result in a loss.

Eugene Kim, CNBC


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Previous 2019 Sunday special editions: 65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

2018 Sunday Editions: 2018  ·  Game of Thrones  ·  Signal Problems · CTE and Football · Facebook · Shark Repellent · Movies · Voting Rights · Goats · Invitation Only · Fat Bear Week · Weinersmith · Airplane Bathrooms ·  NIMBYs ·  Fall 2018 Sports Analytics ·  The Media  ·  Omega-3  ·  Mattress Troubles  ·  Conspiracy Theorists  ·  Beaches  ·  Bubbles  ·  NYC Trash  ·  Fish Wars  ·  Women’s Jeans  ·  Video Stores

Numlock News: March 20, 2019

By Walt Hickey

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Heart

It’s been a 19-year process, but finally the transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) procedure has firmly entered the mainstream, with future conversations about TAVR being more about surgery as the alternative, rather than TAVR being an alternative to surgery. Sure, it’s less profitable for hospitals — TAVR valves cost $30,000 compared to the $6,000 for surgical valves, yet reimbursement from Medicare and Medicaid is similar — but the results are better and TAVR is way less invasive. The width of the devices is down to about 5 millimeters compared to the 8 millimeters it began at, and fears that implantation could cause strokes have been put at ease with a recently presented study finding 1 percent of TAVR recipients suffered a stroke, compared to 3 percent of those who underwent surgery. The market, $3.8 billion last year, will rise to $6 billion by 2021.

Matthew Herper, STAT News

Late Night

Late-night television is a fearsome battleground and the desire to electrify audiences may lead some late-night comedians to wander into, dare I say it, sensitive topics like politics. Some lean into it harder than others. As a result, according to a new Morning Consult survey more Democrats than Republicans had favorable opinions of literally every single late-night host. Stephen Colbert had the widest spread — a 38 percentage point difference between favorability among Democrats and Republicans — a figure that is higher even than The Daily Show’s Trevor Noah and, no joke, Bill Maher, a person who has dedicated his entire professional life to being unpleasant to hear. The late-night audience skews left in general — 54 percent of Dems watched late-night talk shows while 26 percent of Republicans did — and, in general, Democrats had a bigger appetite for late-night hosts delving into politics.

Sarah Shevenock, Morning Consult

Wite-Out

Wite-Out was absolutely essential when a clerk in the typing pool tapped the wrong key on the typewriter and needed to fix the flub lickety-split. That entire sentence is basically obsolete now, so it’s actually a bit surprising to discover that correction fluid is inexplicably doing fine? Wite-Out sales rose 10 percent in 2017 according to the latest available public numbers, and overall sales of correction fluid were up an estimated 1 percent from 2017 to 2018. All despite the fact that overall the U.S. stationary and office supply market has remained stubbornly flat, inching up from $86.4 billion in 2015 to $87.5 billion in 2018.

David A. Graham, The Atlantic

Coral

A new analysis of dead corals found around the Daya Bay in China suggests they were growing between 6,850 and 5,510 years ago. Daya’s ocean temperatures today are colder than those that can sustain vibrant coral reefs, but that time period of growth for the ancient reef coincided with an era when the temperatures around South China were one to two degrees Celsius warmer. So while climate change is pretty much going to boil existing coral reefs alive, there is hope that they could migrate to new territory as temperatures rise in the decades to come. There are plenty of hurdles — I’m loose on my marine science these days, but coral does not strike me to be a particularly migratory beast — but the findings do produce some hope.

Lucas Joel, Scientific American

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Water

A years-long negotiation between Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming over the fate of the Colorado River in times of drought has finally come to a conclusion, with the states now seeking approval from Congress for the plan. The Colorado River is the lifeblood of the arid West, serving 40 million people and sustaining 7,812 square miles of farmland. The plan would entail states voluntarily giving up water in dry times in order to ensure Lake Mead and Lake Powell remain stable.

Felicia Fonseca, The Associated Press

Files

Donated devices can come back to bite their previous owners, with recent research showing that among a $650 purchase of 85 used devices, a security firm found that only two were properly wiped while the other 83 had over 366,300 files on them, containing email addresses, Social Security numbers, credit card information, dates of birth and more identifying details. Not suggesting that anyone goes all Dale Gribble here when it comes to the paranoia, but it’s worth overdoing it with the file erasure and hard drive destruction when discarding computers.

Zach Whittaker, TechCrunch

Planes

The U.S. Air Force’s five-year plan will bring back a new iteration of Boeing’s F-15 fighter at the expense of Lockheed Martin’s new, and at times troubled, F-35. The Air Force had planned to buy eight F-15Xs and 54 F-35s each year from 2021 though 2023. The new plan will instead involve buying 18 F-15Xs and 48 F-35s every year, effectively dropping six of the newer Lockheed planes in exchange for 10 of the older Boeing models.

Anthony Capaccio, Bloomberg


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Previous 2019 Sunday special editions: 65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

2018 Sunday Editions: 2018  ·  Game of Thrones  ·  Signal Problems · CTE and Football · Facebook · Shark Repellent · Movies · Voting Rights · Goats · Invitation Only · Fat Bear Week · Weinersmith · Airplane Bathrooms ·  NIMBYs ·  Fall 2018 Sports Analytics ·  The Media  ·  Omega-3  ·  Mattress Troubles  ·  Conspiracy Theorists  ·  Beaches  ·  Bubbles  ·  NYC Trash  ·  Fish Wars  ·  Women’s Jeans  ·  Video Stores

Numlock News: March 19, 2019

By Walt Hickey

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Eggs

With the instant caveat that nutrition studies are weird and should not always be trusted, I regret to announce that eggs are once again bad. A long-term 30,000 adult study found that there are risks to consuming too many eggs, a fact true of literally all food. Still, you really have to be eating a lot of eggs to be worried: people who consumed two eggs per day (14 per week!) saw a 27 percent increased risk of developing heart disease, which is bad news for Oviraptors, Gaston from Beauty and the Beast and no one else.

Allison Aubrey, NPR

Gene Therapy

A team of UC Berkeley researchers have used a genetic therapy to restore partial sight in blind mice. Diseases like macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa work by destroying photoreceptor cells in the retina, but other cells that are insensitive to light tend to not die. The gene therapy uses a virus to inject a gene into those other cells to make them light sensitive. The UC Berkeley team made 90 percent of ganglion cells light sensitive during the trial, which is obviously preliminary but pretty encouraging.

Drew Costley, SFGate

Hey, if you want to read more about “gene therapy” I talked to Bloomberg’s Max Nisen all about them in a Numlock Sunday three weeks ago. Just for fun, that interview will be taken out from paid-only for the next day or so if you want to give it a read.

Farmers Markets

The number of farmers markets in the U.S. rose from 2,000 in 1994 to 8,600 markets in 2019, which is bad because it’s not like there are more farmers now than there were in 1994. While demand is up, that’s still an unsustainable rate. In Oregon, while 62 new markets opened over the course of one multi-year study, 32 closed. The issue is that there are far too many farmers markets and they’re cannibalizing each other’s customers and also farmers. The answer here is fairly clear, obviously we just cancel most of the farmers markets and agree to combine them all into that one near my apartment, it’s pretty obvious.

Jodi Helmer, NPR

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Large Computer

The Department of Energy has released details about its future $500 million computer based on Intel and Cray technology. It’ll be delivered in 2021, and will be the first American machine that can surpass a quintillion calculations per second. Because The Department of Energy and I are basically the same type of easy mark, they will also be buying more computers after buying this one. They’re justifying the $1.8 billion expenditure by using vague references to future projects like “code breaking” and “research” that they will finally be able to do with the processing power that apparently the Raspberry Pi behind the router just couldn’t handle. While that’s a likely story, the more realistic answer is China has 227 systems in the top 500 most powerful and the U.S. has 109. At press time, Energy Secretary Rick Perry was presumably browsing Newegg and thinking about heading over to the Best Buy to see if there was anything good in the open box discount bin.

Don Clark, The New York Times

Maximum Wage

There are 68 teams that make up the men’s bracket of the NCAA’s March Madness tournament and this year, 47 are public universities. Overall, those coaches make a combined $96,259,815, or $2,139,107 on average. Some, but not all, of that gets some pretty reliable return-on-investment: John Calipari at Kentucky does make $7.95 million per year, but the school’s basketball program brought in $49.7 million on average over the past several seasons for a $22.9 million annual average profit. But not every public university is Kentucky, and it’s often rough to be a resident of the states where the highest-paid state employee coaches basketball. I plan to spend March Madness the William & Mary way, which is rooting for no one and gambling amorally.

Joe Setyon, Reason

Digitization

The federal government has sunk $36 billion into the digitization of medical records, with the end result leaving basically every party involved more miserable than they were 10 years ago. The effort achieved what it desired — 96 percent of hospitals now use electronic health records, up from 9 percent in 2008 — but it’s a patchwork of tech that medical practitioners loathe and hasn’t lived up to the promises of a digital revolution in medicine. It’s hard to see five patients per hour, treat them, enter 100 pieces of data and not screw up. As a result, a Kaiser Family Foundation survey found some 21 percent of patients observed an error in their personal electronic health record. Geez, if only the government knew a guy with a supercomputer that could take a stab at this.

Fred Schulte and Erika Fry, Kaiser Health News

War!

The Writers Guild of America is locked in a contentious fight with Hollywood’s Association of Talent Agents, and it could get ugly if they don’t come to terms by the time their contract expires on April 6. The writers contend that the agencies have morphed into something far more complex than simple talent representation and have lost sight of their obligations to negotiate on behalf of their clients when the agencies themselves have become the producers and packagers of content. The agencies counter that packaging deals have made the writers and everyone else a whole lot of money, so maybe they should cool it with the “break up the agencies” routine because that’s not likely to end in a deal. The latest salvo is the agencies’ contention that eliminating packaging fees would have cost WGA members $49 million during the 2017-2018 season. Overall, this is a labor dispute to keep an eye on.

Dave McNary, Variety, Variety


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Previous 2019 Sunday special editions: 65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

2018 Sunday Editions: 2018  ·  Game of Thrones  ·  Signal Problems · CTE and Football · Facebook · Shark Repellent · Movies · Voting Rights · Goats · Invitation Only · Fat Bear Week · Weinersmith · Airplane Bathrooms ·  NIMBYs ·  Fall 2018 Sports Analytics ·  The Media  ·  Omega-3  ·  Mattress Troubles  ·  Conspiracy Theorists  ·  Beaches  ·  Bubbles  ·  NYC Trash  ·  Fish Wars  ·  Women’s Jeans  ·  Video Stores

Numlock News: March 18, 2019

By Walt Hickey

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Thrones

The run time for the final season of Game of Thrones has been announced, with the six-episode season clocking in at a total of 432 minutes. Only the first two episodes come in under an hour, with the final two episodes of the season being essentially feature-length hour and twenty minute episodes where, I can only assume, the White Walkers who seek to eradicate humankind and Westerosi coalition in defense of the Realm resolve their differences through the use of communication, bipartisanship, and centrism. That means there are merely 7.2 hours standing between us and a world in which all that’s left to do is wait for The Winds of Winter.

Josh Wigler, The Hollywood Reporter

Bats

As of last Friday, at three of the past six San Antonio Spurs home games a bat has brought the basketball proceedings to a temporary halt. This is because the AT&T Center is effectively a bat-cave that accommodates the periodic presence of basketball games. What gives? Well, the AT&T Center is 25 miles southwest of Bracken Cave, which has 15 million Mexican free-tailed bats in it in the summer. The arena lies basically exactly along the migration path from the bats’ winter home in Central America to their summer home north of San Antonio.

Chris Herring, FiveThirtyEight

Pork

Customs in Jersey are on a roll lately, following up an enormous cocaine bust with the seizure of about 1 million pounds of pork smuggled from China. The seizure of about 50 shipping containers was announced Friday at a warehouse in Elizabeth where three rooms were full of smuggled pork. Of all the things I would think make even the bare minimum of sense to smuggle, I really have to confess “products derived from pig meat” is really not all that high on my list. The pork was smuggled in various ways like ramen noodle bowls and Tide detergent, which why? Why would you do that? That sounds awful. Adding to concerns is that there’s an outbreak of African swine fever in China right now and should that spread stateside the negative impacts could near $10 billion in damages.

Sophia Nieto-Munoz, NJ Advance Media

Productive Vibes

Productivity is infectious. A 2017 study found that working near people who are good at their job makes you more effective at yours. Sitting within 25 feet of a high performer at work improved a given worker’s performance by 15 percent, while sitting within 25 feet of a low performer hurt their performance by 30 percent. No joke, I think this is why working hard along with the busy girl in the “lofi hip hop radio - beats to relax/study to” is such an effective placebo for productivity.

Brad Stulberg, Outside Magazine

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Higher, Farther, Faster

Captain Marvel pulled in $69 million domestically in its second weekend, bringing its cumulative North American total to $265 million and $760 million globally. It’s all but assured to join the billion club, and the box office desperately needed this shot in the arm: ticket sales are down 19 percent compared to 2018, when Black Panther proved a February juggernaut.

Rebecca Rubin, Variety

Home Shopping

Ever wonder about those weird “deals” segments during morning shows? They make a killing, in part because hawking goods over the television is still an incredible business. The Today show made $60 million from its “Steals & Deals” segment last year, and even industry staple QVC continues to make a killing, and much of it is thanks to e-commerce. QVC (which bought rivals HSN and Zulily for $2.1 billion and $2.4 billion, respectively) has made more and more of its money online: in 2017, online sales were 59 percent of revenue, a figure that then rose to 62 percent in 2018, two-thirds of which were made by mobile app. Because even as retail businesses see continued change to the brick-and-mortar spaces, charming people demonstrating products on television will always be a money maker.

Kaitlyn Tiffany, The Goods

Hippocrates Probably Would Not Love This

A survey of primary care doctors found that about 45 percent were contractually locked into restrictive covenants, which are basically non-competes and no-poaching agreements. That means that should doctors go from one practice to another, they can’t alert their patients, which seems non-ideal. This is causing issues in rural areas, which may forbid physicians from setting up a new or competing private practice in an area already somewhat deprived of doctors.

Michelle Andrews, The New York Times


Thank you so much for subscribing! If you're enjoying the newsletter, forward it to someone you think may enjoy it too! Send links to me on Twitter at @WaltHickey or email me with numbers, tips, or feedback at walt@numlock.news. Send corrections or typos to the copy desk at copy@numlock.news.

Previous 2019 Sunday special editions: Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

2018 Sunday Editions: 2018  ·  Game of Thrones  ·  Signal Problems · CTE and Football · Facebook · Shark Repellent · Movies · Voting Rights · Goats · Invitation Only · Fat Bear Week · Weinersmith · Airplane Bathrooms ·  NIMBYs ·  Fall 2018 Sports Analytics ·  The Media  ·  Omega-3  ·  Mattress Troubles  ·  Conspiracy Theorists  ·  Beaches  ·  Bubbles  ·  NYC Trash  ·  Fish Wars  ·  Women’s Jeans  ·  Video Stores

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