Numlock News: May 21, 2019 • Old Bay, Twitch, El Capitan

By Walt Hickey

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Old Bay

Despite being fundamentally linked to the region, Old Bay is no longer the preferred crab seasoning in the Baltimore region. 18 out of 30 crab houses use J.O. No. 2 seasoning, six use Harbor Spice and only one used Old Bay, which is owned by spice conglomerate McCormick’s. Price is part of it — two pounds of Harbor Spice Co.’s 1394 goes for $7.50, two pounds of J.O. goes for $9.25 and the same amount of Old Bay would set you back $18 at a local supermarket. J.O.’s dominance is spelled out in the numbers: they distribute to 900 crab and seafood houses in the middle Atlantic and move 3.5 million to 5 million pounds of crab seasoning annually.

Christina Tkacik and Christine Zhang, The Baltimore Sun

Twitching

Last year, people spent 8.9 billion hours watching video game streaming content on Twitch, which was up from 6.3 billion hours the year before in 2017. With that many eyeballs watching independent streamers, big-budget video game launches increasingly come with a budget to pay those streamers to get into their game. Those elite streamers who can maintain real-time audiences of 15,000 at a time can make between $25,000 and $35,000 per hour during the big launches, with the top tier getting in the ballpark of $50,000 per hour.

Sarah E. Needleman, The Wall Street Journal

Amenities

A new study of where Americans live found that 23 percent live within walking distance of shops, restaurants or entertainment venues, 44 percent live within a short car trip and 33 percent live in low-amenity communities. Interestingly this actually has some impact on attitudes and even happiness: people who live in high-amenity places are almost twice as likely to say they trust their local government — 39 percent — compared to those who live in areas without those things (22 percent). If hanging out at the local bar makes you trust municipal government more, I’m like one weekly trivia night away from being Leslie Knope.

Daniel Cox and Ryan Streeter, The Atlantic

Noncompetes

Noncompete clauses were originally implemented to guarantee that current employees didn’t divulge corporate secrets to competitors after leaving the company. They’ve since become a cudgel wielded by companies to deprive competitors of talent and hamstring their own employee’s ability to negotiate for higher wages. Traditionally, a clause for higher-income workers, today some 15 percent of workers earning between $20,000 and $40,000 per year are under a noncompete, as well as 13 percent of workers who earn $0 to $20,000 per year. While 20 percent of workers who haven’t completed high school are under a noncompete. When Hawaii banned noncompete agreements for tech jobs, a study later found the ban increased worker mobility by 11 percent and wages for new hires by 4 percent.

Harriet Torry, The Wall Street Journal

Audits

New data released by the IRS found that due to shrunken budgets and staffing cuts the audit rate for families that make adjusted gross incomes of $10 million or more was 6.66 percent, half the rate it was last year. Among those making $5 million to $9.9 million, the audit rate was down to 4.2 percent from 8 percent last year. So, either the richest people on earth got a lot more honest, or a decade of staffing cuts and technological morass has finally accomplished the very goals of those who seek to stymie the IRS's ability to investigate the wealthiest.

Natasha Frost, Quartz

Consoling

Sony has cut a massive deal with Microsoft, and the future of video games hangs in the balance. The market for video game consoles is $38 billion, and faster internet speeds are opening up the possibility of cloud gaming, where the computing work of playing a game is done on some server rather than on the box in the home. PlayStation and Xbox are jeopardized by this development, and the huge news is that Sony’s decided to collaborate with Microsoft (which has the second largest cloud service) rather than try to compete, with plans to host some PlayStation online services on Azure. Cloud gaming is projected to be only 2 percent of industry revenue by 2023, so not only are consoles still kicking, but there’s also a new generation dropping next year.

Yuji Nakamura and Dina Bass, Bloomberg

El Capitan

The iconic granite El Capitan in Yosemite is the site of rockfalls originating from “flakes.” These are effectively sheets of rock that are anchored to the main edifice by slowly shrinking connections. Using infrared tech to look behind two of the largest sheets — Boot Flake and Texas Flake — presents a worrying picture at what exactly is fastening them to the rock. By measuring how heat moves through the granite, the bridge connecting Boot Flake to El Capitan is about 55 square feet, or 6.8 percent of the total area. Oh, I definitely should have mentioned that Boot Flake is a sheet of granite a third of the size of a tennis court. Texas Flake, is connected by a paltry 16 square feet of area, 0.8 percent of the area. Boot Flake is stable for the time being, but the geologists are keen to keep a closer eye on Texas Flake.

Katherine Kornei, The New York Times

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Thank you so much for subscribing! If you're enjoying the newsletter, forward it to someone you think may enjoy it too! Send links to me on Twitter at @WaltHickey or email me with numbers, tips, or feedback at walt@numlock.news. Send corrections or typos to the copy desk at copy@numlock.news.

Previous 2019 Sunday special editions: Crazy/Genius ·  Scrubbers ·  Saving the World ·  Summer Movies ·  No One Man Should Have All That Power ·  Film Incentives ·  Stadiums & Casinos ·  Late Night ·  65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

2018 Sunday Editions: 2018  ·  Game of Thrones  ·  Signal Problems · CTE and Football · Facebook · Shark Repellent · Movies · Voting Rights · Goats · Invitation Only · Fat Bear Week · Weinersmith · Airplane Bathrooms ·  NIMBYs ·  Fall 2018 Sports Analytics ·  The Media  ·  Omega-3  ·  Mattress Troubles  ·  Conspiracy Theorists  ·  Beaches  ·  Bubbles  ·  NYC Trash  ·  Fish Wars  ·  Women’s Jeans  ·  Video Stores

Numlock News: May 20, 2019 • John Wick, HBO, Kilos

By Walt Hickey

Good morning!

Just A Flesh Wound

Avengers: Endgame was finally unseated from its perch at the top of the domestic box office, with the aggressively punctuated John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum making $57 million in North America, a beat of expectations. The film tells the heartwarming story of a beloved former employee going back to his job and meeting all sorts of new people who respect and appreciate his work, and the zany circumstances our friend Johnny finds himself in while trying to settle a conflict! It’s fun for the whole family, as long as your entire family is of age for hard-R rated films. Meanwhile, Detective Pikachu held its place atop the international box office for the second consecutive week, earning another $53.8 million and bringing its global total to a respectable $287.4 million.

Rebecca Rubin, Variety

HBO

Last night, one of the biggest cash cows for HBO came to its conclusion. If you’ve been watching Game of Thrones, I’m sure you’ve also seen the pre-roll ads for all the rest of HBO’s forthcoming television, and the reason is that HBO is fairly concerned about the future of the pay-TV network in the aftermath of losing its most prominent signature anchor program. The network boosted its original programming slate by 50 percent this year in a push to get ahead of subscriber bleeding, boosting scripted programming production from 100 hours in 2018 to 150 hours for 2019. Of the 50 million U.S. subscribers, 7 million subscribe directly through HBO Now, and the network needs to convert Game of Thrones fans into HBO fans fast.

Gerry Smith, Bloomberg

Kilogram

As of today, the definition of a kilogram has formally changed. Previously, the kilogram was a physical object known as the International Prototype Kilogram, a chunk of platinum-iridium alloy located at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures since 1889. All other kilograms have been derived from that specific entity. But as the necessity of increasingly precise units of mass became important, we ran into the problem of having a physical manifestation representing a common unit. Namely, its mass was slightly changing. It’s lost about 50 micrograms since its creation, which is not great. That’s why the kilogram is now defined in relation to a physical constant of the universe, much as how the length of a meter has been anchored to the immutable speed of light since 1983, when it was decided that a meter is the distance traveled by light in 1/299,792,458 of a second. After years of research determining with precision the value of Planck’s constant, today the transition takes full effect.

Brian Resnick, Vox

Right to Repair

From consumer electronics to industrial machinery, there’s lots of corporate opposition to a “right to repair.” The reason is simple: when product manufacturers make it hard or impossible for a buyer to repair their own equipment, that buyer has to pay the original manufacturer a lot of money to fix the product, as anyone who’s replaced the dead battery on a 2013 MacBook Air can attest. Market researcher IBISWorld estimated repair spending in the U.S. last year to be $39.1 billion for heavy machinery and $22.4 billion for cellphones, an important reminder that it’s not just Apple opposing end-user repair, it’s also John Deere and Caterpillar opposing farmers repairing their own tractors. The finances are cut-and-dry for the equipment manufacturers: Deere made $37.36 billion in revenue in 2018, and $5.8 billion was from parts sales, and growing.

Claire Bushey, Crain’s Chicago Business

Aldi

Aldi is a German supermarket with 1,800 stores in 35 states, and it has a legion of fans who like the grocery store thanks to its zero-frills shopping experience and resulting low prices. It’ll become the third-largest grocer in the U.S. behind Kroger and Walmart soon enough with a projected 2,500 stores by the end of 2022. A basket of common goods at a Houston, Texas Walmart in July 2017 cost $77.61, but when the Aldi moved in across the street that basket cost only $58.91 at the new store. By March 2019, Aldi’s prices stayed about the same at $55.83, while Walmart was forced to drop prices to $68.16 just to keep up. Aldi requires customers to put down a deposit ensuring the safe return of carts and maintains a stripped-down selection, 1,400 items compared to the 40,000 at a traditional supermarket and 100,000 at a Walmart Supercenter.

Nathaniel Meyersohn, CNN Business

Fertility

The cost of preserving sperm or eggs is substantial, with the cost of preserving sperm costing $1,000 for collection and up to $500 per year for storage and the cost of preserving eggs costing up to $25,000 for collection and up to $1,000 per year for storage. Those costs are before even the people acting on those cold-storage solutions. Medical necessity is often the case with young people who suffer from cancers, with a 2010 study finding 25 percent of young adults with cancer taking steps to pursue fertility preservation ahead of treatments that can damage or remove the responsible organs. Insurers now can also expect an influx of claims from transgender patients who also may face infertility after undergoing treatments. It’s still quite early — as it stands, less than 5 percent of transgender youth pursue fertility preservation — but it’s a growing area of coverage.

Shira Stein, Bloomberg Law

Indian Elections

A six-week election has finally come to a close, and with it exit polls showing a strong victory for incumbent Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi have been publicly released. His Bharatiya Janata Party is projected to secure something between 280 and 315 seats, which is well-above the 272 seats needed to secure a majority. A fifth exit poll put BJP’s seat count at 267 seats. There are 900 million eligible voters who, over the course of 39 days, attend 1 million polling stations. The results will be announced Thursday.

BBC

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Thank you so much for subscribing! If you're enjoying the newsletter, forward it to someone you think may enjoy it too! Send links to me on Twitter at @WaltHickey or email me with numbers, tips, or feedback at walt@numlock.news. Send corrections or typos to the copy desk at copy@numlock.news.

Previous 2019 Sunday special editions: Crazy/Genius ·  Scrubbers ·  Saving the World ·  Summer Movies ·  No One Man Should Have All That Power ·  Film Incentives ·  Stadiums & Casinos ·  Late Night ·  65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

2018 Sunday Editions: 2018  ·  Game of Thrones  ·  Signal Problems · CTE and Football · Facebook · Shark Repellent · Movies · Voting Rights · Goats · Invitation Only · Fat Bear Week · Weinersmith · Airplane Bathrooms ·  NIMBYs ·  Fall 2018 Sports Analytics ·  The Media  ·  Omega-3  ·  Mattress Troubles  ·  Conspiracy Theorists  ·  Beaches  ·  Bubbles  ·  NYC Trash  ·  Fish Wars  ·  Women’s Jeans  ·  Video Stores

Numlock News: May 17, 2019 • SNL, THC, Eggs

By Walt Hickey

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Baby

Kylie Jenner submitted an application to the United States Patent and Trademarks Office last week to sell items under the brand Kylie Baby, which means that the Kardashian cosmetics and fashion empire has eyes set on the lucrative world of merchandise for infants. Despite slipping birth rates in the U.S., globally speaking that’s still a fine business to be in: the expectation is for the global market for baby products to grow 5.5 percent annually to hit $16.78 billion by 2025. Scoff all you want, but Jenner may very well make a profit by having another kid, which basically no other human in America can claim.

Laura Stampler, Fortune

Recruiters

Facebook may not have suffered any significant economic, legal or financial consequences whatsoever for the Cambridge Analytica scandal, but reports from ex-recruiters seem to show that the coders of tomorrow are logging off. In the 2017-2018 school year, the acceptance rate for full-time positions offered by Facebook to recent grads was 85 percent. As of December, former Facebook recruiters put that number between 35 percent and 55 percent. Facebook disputes the figures, but it’s not exactly the first time youth abandoned the social network.

Salvador Rodriguez, CNBC

Plastics

By 2025 the plastic packaging market is projected to be worth $365 billion, and the reason it’s held that “the future is in plastics” is because of aggressive and bare-knuckle lobbying efforts on the part of the plastics industry to stymie legislative attempts to curb litter since the late 1980s. The world creates 300 million tons of plastic waste every year, however proactive legislatures friendly with the industry — such as those in about a dozen states — pass laws prevent municipalities or cities from regulating single-use plastic at the risk of losing all state funding.

Tik Root, The Center for Public Integrity

High

There were an estimated 26 million Americans who were marijuana users in 2017, and the stuff they were smoking was some truly powerful bud. Science has finally confirmed what we as a society all know, what Americans on the pot consumption spectrum that extends from James Comey to Snoop all realize, the The Great Dowd Discovery of 2014, and that is that weed got strong. The potency of weed increased from approximately 4 percent THC in 1995 to 12 percent in 2014 to 17.1 percent in 2017.

Rhitu Chatterjee, NPR

SNL

A new study has found that over the course of the 44 seasons of SNL, 627 of the 894 hosts have been men and 797 were white, meaning that male hosts outnumbered women by a 40-point margin and 89 percent of them have been white. The last few years have been a bit better when it comes to featuring hosts of color — in the 43rd season, 8 of 21 hosts were people of color — but the last time a season had gender parity among hosts was in 2004. The last time a season had good quality among sketches remains an open question.

Sarah Shevenock, Morning Consult

Eggs

Eggs, which perpetually existing in a quantum state of being both good for you, but also bad for you, have a legion of competition from plant-based competitors. Egg’s essential role in nutrition — literally the thing that holds basically all food together — mean developing a replacement is an attractive prospect. Just Inc., the top contender making plant-based eggs, announced it’s sold the equivalent of 6.3 million chicken eggs since rolling out a liquid egg substitute last year. That’s great, and we’re all super proud of them. Quick context: egg production in the U.S. was 8.5 billion eggs. Oh, that number is in February alone. For a $7 billion business, eggs are tough to break into the hard way: one company taking a more bottom-up approach has successfully recreated 3 egg proteins, of which there are 80.

Larissa Zimberoff, Bloomberg

Deductible

It’s not just you: employer-sponsored health insurance is indeed getting worse. Deductibles — the out-of-pocket amount a person has to pay before insurance kicks in — averaged $533 for a single person in 2009, but have since risen to $1,350 in 2018. By comparing that to the health spending of average people, the Kaiser Family Foundation can calculate the day of the year by which the average health spending for an American meets their employer coverage’s deductible. In 2006, that day was Feb. 28. This year, it’s May 19, so have a great Saturday everybody and don’t forget, you can’t roll over that FSA spending into next year because even “good” health insurance in America is a hellscape.

Matthew Rae, Cynthia Cox, Gary Claxton and Larry Levitt, Kaiser Family Foundation

Northern Ireland

Game of Thrones may conclude this weekend, but it’s left a pretty permanent mark on Northern Ireland, where some 75 percent of the series was filmed on either sound stages or natural locations. The show pumped more than $250 million into the local economy and also established a beachhead for a burgeoning film business. More than 13,000 people have been cast as extras, which is particularly wild since just shy of 1 percent of the 1.8 million inhabitants of Northern Ireland have been in Game of Thrones, and the tourism boom that followed pumped at least $64 million into the economy in 2018 alone.

Meredith Blake, The Los Angeles Times

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This past weekend’s Sunday special was a wonderful talk with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic’s podcast Crazy/Genius. I really love Derek’s work, you should check out the podcast here.

Thanks to the paid subscribers to Numlock News who make this possible. Subscribers guarantee this stays ad-free, and get a special Sunday edition. Consider becoming a full subscriber today.


Thank you so much for subscribing! If you're enjoying the newsletter, forward it to someone you think may enjoy it too! Send links to me on Twitter at @WaltHickey or email me with numbers, tips, or feedback at walt@numlock.news. Send corrections or typos to the copy desk at copy@numlock.news.

Previous 2019 Sunday special editions: Crazy/Genius ·  Scrubbers ·  Saving the World ·  Summer Movies ·  No One Man Should Have All That Power ·  Film Incentives ·  Stadiums & Casinos ·  Late Night ·  65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

2018 Sunday Editions: 2018  ·  Game of Thrones  ·  Signal Problems · CTE and Football · Facebook · Shark Repellent · Movies · Voting Rights · Goats · Invitation Only · Fat Bear Week · Weinersmith · Airplane Bathrooms ·  NIMBYs ·  Fall 2018 Sports Analytics ·  The Media  ·  Omega-3  ·  Mattress Troubles  ·  Conspiracy Theorists  ·  Beaches  ·  Bubbles  ·  NYC Trash  ·  Fish Wars  ·  Women’s Jeans  ·  Video Stores

Numlock News: May 16, 2019 • Honey, Peas, Ransomware

By Walt Hickey

Next Door

Good fences may make good neighbors, but the app NextDoor wants to break down those fences and connect you to your neighbors, which walking through the metaphor kind of sounds terrible. Investors are looking past the fact that the less that people know about others, the better we’re able to improvise social cohesion and are dumping a fortune into the app: it secured a $123 million round that gives it a $2.1 billion valuation. The conceit is that NextDoor enables neighbors to meet through location-based message boards, which I’m sure sounded great in theory to a person that has never been to a single HOA or neighborhood board meeting in their entire life. Worth highlighting is that the $112.4 million invested in 48 social media startups by venture capital firms was the lowest since 2005, signaling that just maybe we’ll soon be free of social dilettantes attempting to profit by mining into our collective sense of discretion.

Katie Roof, The Wall Street Journal

Not So Fast, Sheldon

While Game of Thrones and The Big Bang Theory are getting all the headlines about the record-breaking tune-in for live television audiences, another nerdy staple has sneakily stolen the title of most-watch prime time broadcast: Jeopardy! brought in 13.3 million viewers on average in the week ending May 5. Literally 8.3 percent of U.S. television homes watching at some point, the best weekly average in 14 years. That handily makes The Big Bang Theory (12.5 million viewers) and Game of Thrones (11.8 million) look niche by comparison. Granted, Jeopardy! doesn’t have any particular re-watch or delayed viewing traction, as the other shows have in spades, but it’s always nice to see syndicated programming do a flex for the fans. And imagine, for the tens if not hundreds of millions needed to make those episodes happen, Trebek got away with paying just $1.7 million so far.

Josef Adalian, Vulture

Sticky

Wednesday saw the three left eastbound lanes of I-80 in Indiana close following a semi truck hauling 41,000 pound of amber honey overturning before the morning rush. It took until 1:30 in the afternoon to wipe up the mess, described as a mixture of diesel and honey, which is a great name for a band. Five containers of honey spilled from the trailer, and at least half of the other eight were leaking.

Katherine Rosenberg-Douglas, Chicago Tribune

Commissions

As the internet has managed to wipe out a number of previously stable occupations — retailer, travel agent, financial advisors — real estate agents have seen their commissions and headcount fairly undisturbed by the onset of the internet. Even though half of buyers find a house online, 87 percent of those buyers still end up retaining an agent who gets 3 percent despite not in fact finding them that home. The average commission — split by buyer’s agent and seller’s agent — declined from 6.1 percent in 1991 to 5.1 percent in 2016, but lots of that drop is in luxury homes. There are now 1.36 million members of the National Association of Realtors, but three lawsuits may do what no startup has done yet by alleging that the steady commissions are the result of collusion by NAR, which violates antitrust laws, an allegation which is disputed by the group.

Lydia DePillis, CNN Business

Peas

Now that we’ve all apparently agreed to take veggie burgers seriously as a product class, it’s time to look in on what’s really behind the meat alternatives. Peas, the answer is peas. Soy fell out of favor, and the star ingredient in an increasing number of the faux-flesh is the humble pea, and it’s all part of Canada’s long plan to dominate the world. Global pea protein sales are projected to quadruple by 2025 thanks in a major way to the meat substitutes. Canada is most poised to capitalize, accounting for a projected 30 percent of all pea production by 2020. Right now, producers of the meat substitutes are locking down supply chains and shaking a lot of pea farmer’s hands.

Deena Shanker and Lydia Mulvany, Bloomberg

Ransomware

A ransomware attack is when a hacker obtains access to your computer, encrypts all your files and then demands bitcoin in exchange for the password. If it sucks as an individual, for companies, hospitals and law enforcement it’s a nightmare that costs thousands. The FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center counted 1,493 ransomware victims in 2018, but most companies that get data taken hostage prefer that to remain on the down-low, and the actual estimate from the Department of Homeland Security is 4,000 ransomware attacks per day for about 1.5 million per year. There are companies that purport to step in and use technology to decrypt the hacked tech for a fee, which is a real blessing. Or it would be, except for the fact that a ProPublica investigation found that some of these companies just pay the ransom and take some profit on top, restoring the client’s system and letting the afflicted client keep plausible deniability.

Renee Dudley and Jeff Kao, ProPublica

The Net Is Dark And Full Of Terrors

HBO is having one of the most consequential months of its existence with the conclusion of Game of Thrones, which is why it’s kind of baffling that they’ve had such a difficult time containing spoilers and leaks. Film studios and television shows have all sorts of ways to keep the lid on when it comes to hot-ticket media, so why does Thrones seem to scoop the wire on a nigh weekly basis? The issue is that HBO has to distribute the show to something like 180 markets a day ahead of time for translation and simultaneous air purposes. You might think, well, why bother with all 180 of them if clearly a few are just going to leak it early, and the answer is two-fold: HBO has to air it worldwide simultaneously or the show will be pirated basically immediately, and the second is that North American HBO subscribers are distinctly outnumbered on this one. HBO has about 140 million global subscribers, and even more millions get Thrones through a licensed third party and only 50 million live in the U.S.

Joseph Adalian, Vulture

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Thanks to the paid subscribers to Numlock News who make this possible. Subscribers guarantee this stays ad-free, and get a special Sunday edition. Consider becoming a full subscriber today.


Thank you so much for subscribing! If you're enjoying the newsletter, forward it to someone you think may enjoy it too! Send links to me on Twitter at @WaltHickey or email me with numbers, tips, or feedback at walt@numlock.news. Send corrections or typos to the copy desk at copy@numlock.news.

Previous 2019 Sunday special editions: Scrubbers ·  Saving the World ·  Summer Movies ·  No One Man Should Have All That Power ·  Film Incentives ·  Stadiums & Casinos ·  Late Night ·  65 is the new 50 ·  Scooternomics ·  Gene Therapy ·  SESTA/FOSTA ·  CAPTCHA ·  New Zealand ·  Good To Go ·  California Football ·  Personality Testing ·  China’s Corruption Crackdown ·  Yosemite

2018 Sunday Editions: 2018  ·  Game of Thrones  ·  Signal Problems · CTE and Football · Facebook · Shark Repellent · Movies · Voting Rights · Goats · Invitation Only · Fat Bear Week · Weinersmith · Airplane Bathrooms ·  NIMBYs ·  Fall 2018 Sports Analytics ·  The Media  ·  Omega-3  ·  Mattress Troubles  ·  Conspiracy Theorists  ·  Beaches  ·  Bubbles  ·  NYC Trash  ·  Fish Wars  ·  Women’s Jeans  ·  Video Stores

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